Quiet Determination in Action

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Posted in Uncategorized by missamyyu on September 20, 2009

Hepatitis B Outreach Updates

September has been an incredible whirlwind of hepatitis B outreach activities.  I’ve been out at events every weekend this month.  Finished with another Vietnamese screening (we held one in partnership with the Vietnamese Reach for Health Coalition last weekend, which was very successful!) today.  This one was held at a Vietnamese church, and it ran smoothly despite less than expected numbers attending.  However, UP did a good job setting this up and gaining the church’s buy-in, so I’m proud of her work for this summer.

In retrospect, I believe that in order for our outreach projects to be more successful, we’ll need to return to the partnered education and screenings  instead of trying to squeeze ourselves into the Sunday church schedule. Unless we have the entire church’s buy-in, it is difficult to incorporate our education and screening program.

I just heard of two new high school hepatitis B awareness groups that will be forming from students who attended our Youth Leadership Conference in August.  It makes me really excited to hear that we are able to inspire these young leaders to take action in their communities.

SF Treasure Island Dragon Boat Festival (Sept. 26 & 27th) next weekend!  Come out and enjoy the races and stop by our booth for hepatitis B education – or better yet, sign up to volunteer by contacting alcvolunteers@gmail.com

Social Media Fun
I have been fiddling with various social media tools / widgets this past week.  One of my particular favorites is the introduction of TimesPeople on NYTimes.com where I can directly tweet, facebook, digg, etc. articles that I find intriguing.  Plus, I can also recommend articles, and these articles will show up on my TimesPeople profile where those who follow me can read about my suggestions. I think this is a fantastic move for NYTimes to make the news (especially their news articles) much more accessible to others through peer dissemination. You can find me under the handle missamyyu if you ever decide to you use it.

Posterous has also been a newly acquired social media toy that I’m learning how to use. So bear with me as I test out various posterous features.

Had a fun time teaching BC about Twitter, and had a hilarious exchange about retweeting, and how retweeting only applies to those who are alive.  [Note, he’s an author, so that is how we got to talking about retweeting dead individuals like Ernest Hemingway.]

Of Interest
Tried my hand at mashed cauliflower (the healthier alternative to mashed potatoes) the other day.  Tasted pretty good despite my overuse of butter.

Also, in case you missed it, here’s an article “A Doctor for Disease, a Shaman for the Soul” from the NYTimes.com that highlights the win-win outcomes by integrating culturally sensitive programs into healthcare.

Thanks for reading,
Amy

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Writing and Reading

Posted in Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer, Of Interest, Personal Actions by missamyyu on September 1, 2009

Hello,

In Lane Library of the Stanford medical school campus.  I’m taking a week off from work to work on and finish my secondary applications for medical school.   Wish me luck!  (and luck to those who are working on them as well – this goes out to you, GH)

Hepatitis B and Jade Ribbon Campaign Updates
Our Jade Ribbon Youth Council 2009-2010 application is due this week, and I am looking forward to reading them.  And although I won’t be directly working with the students this year, I am still excited about what they will potentially accomplish this year, and helping them coordinate with high school groups from across the nation.

We’re also opening up academic year internships at the Asian Liver Center this week.  If you’re interested in applying, feel free to email me (amyyu@stanford.edu).

Me at a TweetUp in Silicon Valley - here's me with two great guys from Intel

Me at a TweetUp in Silicon Valley - here's me with two great guys from Intel

Social Media Fun

Attended a Tweet Up last week hosted by Michael Brito on Santana Row.  I had a great time meeting new people and connecting with other social media influencers.  Tweetups are a fantastic idea – you have the opportunity to meet face-to-face with individuals who are the doers and the movers in terms of social media.  Plus, everyone is so kind and willing to listen to your story.  As a person from a non-profit organization, it’s a great way for me to raise awareness and make connections so that I can learn about new ways to leverage social media to eradicate hepatitis B and make some good friends at the same time.

Religious Thought
I had the opportunity to chat with one of my religious studies professors yesterday, and he brought to my attention an interesting new phenomena that has grown popular as of late: The New Atheists.  Essentially, they attack organized religion and see religion as the root of evil and what causes war and subordination.  Now, I don’t disagree that fundamentalist thinking does lead to such violence, but from what I gleaned off the internet and from my professor, it seems that these New Atheists don’t quite give religion its due respect.  I’ll need to pick up their books and then read Terry Eagleton’s polemic against the New Atheists’ assertions.  What’s interesting about Eagleton is that he isn’t particuarly religious himself.  He gave a lecture series at Yale, which I’ll listen to, and post later.   Let me know if you’ve read anything about this / have any thoughts – I would love to hear them.

Alright, back to writing.  Thank you for reading,

Amy

Hepatitis B Youth Outreach & Social Media

Posted in Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer, Of Interest by missamyyu on August 20, 2009

Dear Reader,

Jade Ribbon Campaign news and social media fun are all on today’s agenda.  Hope you’re doing well, and thank goodness the week is almost over (although, I’m not sure if I really like that considering the need to write secondaries).

Asian Liver Center / Jade Ribbon Campaign Update
Finally got around to uploading the online Jade Ribbon Youth Council 2009-2010 application onto the Asian Liver Center website.  I’m excited for what this year’s 15-person high school council will come up with to raise awareness about hepatitis B.

Finally post-processed the Youth Leadership Conference 2009 photos today.  Had the opportunity to teach TC, AC, and CL a little post-processing in Photoshop – I always like to get people Photoshop savvy!  Thx to TC and AC for helping me with the last set of photos.  And, TC has been a great help in uploading the team videos.  I’m looking to upload all those on the ALC website tomorrow.

Also, been talking with SC about nominating HepBMoms (part of the perinatal hepatitis B project SC and CC have been working on) for the Intel “Vote for a Cause” contest on Facebook.  The grand prize will be marketing with Intel – how exciting would that be?  Working on that – hopefully you’ll help out with the voting!

Social Media Fun
I’m not sure when I got into the whole social media thing (some time last year when I was drafting up what YLC 2009 should look like), but it sure is exciting.  It has been really great to meet all these incredibly talented and insightful people who are on the cutting edge of social media (e.g. Beth Kanter & Michael Brito to name a few) – and are so nice!

Today, CL and I attended a social media discussion hosted by Richard “Frosty” Welch from HP that included a guest panel of Michael Brito (Intel), Angela LoSasso (HP), Steve Rubel (Edelman Digital), and Richard Brewer-Hay (Ebay). Great comments about social media theory and practice that  can adapted for non-profit work.  CL and I had questions about how to leverage social media to raising awareness to a public that isn’t already talking about hepatitis B, and Michael and Steve had some great feedback.  Michael even offered to sit down and speak with us about strategy!

Note for self: need to look into Posterous, Friendfeed, and continue to dig around Social Mention

Of Personal Interest
Writing an email to the Stanford Alumni San Francisco group about my dismay with their endorsement of GenerationRescue and the group’s claim that vaccines cause autism and misinforming folks.  So much for doing due diligence and slapping the Stanford name onto irresponsible, media-friendly celebrities.  Here’s a science based resource to such misinformed assertions.  Join me if you think this is wrong, too.

Considering investing in an iPhone or a PalmPre.  Also, heard from a good friend KK – this made me very happy and somewhat nostalgic for the days when we walked to and from Roble to Mudd.

And last, but certainly not least, happy 9th, CT! 🙂  Can’t wait for picnic day!

Thank you for reading,
Amy

Youth Leadership Conference 2009 Part 1 :)

Posted in Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer by missamyyu on August 11, 2009

Greetings from Hot-lanta!

Currently taking a break in the Omni Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia (Shout out to LC!).  I am currently attending the CDC’s 3rd Annual National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing and Media.  AG is presenting on the Jade Ribbon Campaign, and I have a poster presentation on Youth Leadership Conference.  Speaking of Youth Leadership Conference – it was FANTASTIC!!  I had hoped to do daily updates about the exciting things that went on, but alas, each day was full of the many to-do’s and running around.  The students were really great this year, and I was very much impressed with their work on Team Challenges.  The speakers for the conference were also brilliant and super inspiring.  When I get back to the office and am able to pull pictures from the server, I’ll update with brief intros about them and their talks.

I took away quite a bit of things from the conference this year.  One, is that high school students don’t use Twitter.  I didn’t know that!  They claim that it is “stalkerish,” something “old people use,” and it’s useless.  They much rather prefer the Facebook platform since all they really want to know is what their friends are doing.  How interesting!  In fact, you can read about it on Beth Kanter’s blog.  I’m so jazzed that we were highlighted on her blog!  Beth Kanter is one of the leading women in social media technology, so it is an incredible honor to be on her website.  There are even pictures of the students, CL, and me on her Flickr!

I am really indebted to CL for finding Beth’s blog and to BE for making the connection – who knew the world was so small!   I really hope the YLC students take away at least something from her presentation.  I have to admit here that this conference’s theme Web 2.0 was in part, a personal interest that I wanted to expand, and I hope that the students, although perhaps not exactly creators quite yet (well, beyond creating just for their friends), will be able to take what they learned and utilize it in the years to come!

The students came up with some very innovative ideas for social media projects to advance hepatitis B and liver cancer awareness, and I’m looking forward to actually incorporating a lot of their ideas.  This year, many of the ideas are definitely scalable and usable, and I can’t wait to get back in the office to think how to incorporate them into the ALC’s social media / communication plan.    We’ll be  posting up their final presentations on the ALC website soon, so make sure to check it out (I’ll let you all know when it’s up).

The Youth Leadership Conference on Asian and Pacific Islander Health is a conference designed to provide high school students from across the nation with the tools and skills to effect change in their communities and to inspire them to take leadership roles; however, I feel that YLC isn’t just a growing experience just for the students – it is a growing experience for the interns, the Jade Ribbon Youth Council, and especially for me.  I sincerely hope that the Team Leaders (ALC interns) and Assistant Team Leaders (JRYC) had a great time with the conference, and came away with an experience that helped them grow into being more confident leaders.  It’s a very different experience learning to guide a team of high school students and trying to inspire morale and expand their minds.  This year, for feedback, I’m really interested in not just what the YLC participants have to say in how we can improve the conference, I really want to hear what our interns and JRYC have to say.

One thing that I learned this conference (among the many things from all the speakers!) comes from an incident that occured during our late-night YLC staff meeting.  This was Thursday evening – the end of the second day of the conference, and everyone was very tired and rather un-energized.  Not to go into details (you can ask me if you wish.  And big props to RN for talking it through with me that night), but what I learned from this experience was that as a leader, I need to really make sure I open up communication between those I’m working with so that they can let me know if anything is going wrong or if they are frustrated about my management.  This year, I put a lot more trust in my interns to run YLC on their own (much more than I did last year since I was green to the whole management thing and to YLC), but that may have put more stress on them and I probably didn’t offer enough guidance.  So, I’m really looking forward to their feedback this year (I made a list of 30 odd questions for them, so I’m hoping I get some constructive responses).  Leadership is all about communication, and a good leader is able to promote and maintain open dialogue between the people who work with him/her.  Michael Chen put it eloquently: in order for a boat to get somewhere, everyone needs to be paddling together, both the leader and the team, in a synergistic manner.  And for that to happen, open communication needs to be established and cultivated.

But how do you critique  something to your direct supervisor?  I will be the first to admit that I haven’t had the most positive thoughts about every project that I do or think the best of the way a boss manages things, but looking back, I should have said something, even if my supervisor didn’t extend that hand.  If I’m frustrated and I don’t tell my boss, then he/she won’t know, and we can’t work together to find an agreeable solution.  I think it’s the responsibility of both parties to reach out to each other. Dialogue only works when both parties are involved.

I know that a lot of my interns often doubt certain aspects of our various projects (and I’m glad they do, because it shows that they are thinking about them!), but feel uncomfortable saying it directly to me.  So, I’m glad they have other staff to speak to about those uncertainties.  I want to be there for them, but I am probably not the best person to talk to, especially since I’m their outreach coordinator.  I am also glad that during YLC, AG, CC, SC, and MB were able to bring the interns snacks, gatorade, and send encouraging text messages to keep morale high.  It’s hard to listen to one person (aka me) yap about what needs to be done and still keep a smile on your face.  I’m realizing more and more, the way that you hold yourself, your facial expressions, etc. all make a huge impact on how the rest of your team acts and responds.

Alright, enough ruminations from me.  Thanks for reading – if you got through all that (and even if you didn’t thanks for reading the portions that you read).  Time to go to another workshop on how to evaluate web 2.0 efforts.

Also, welcome to Club 23, DT.  It was good speaking with you over the phone yesterday.

Yours,
Amy